Excellent Craft Brews Go Into Cans

For a very long time, the battle of bottles versus cans has raged. Despite any personal preference you might have, the emerging trend is clear – cans are the way to go. While many craft breweries still prefer to bottle their suds in glass, you'll find a growing number of them opting to put their brews in the confines of an aluminum can. Why is this? What brewers are turning to aluminum and eschewing the use of glass altogether?

There are quite a few reasons that brewers are turning to cans, and ditching their glass bottles. Some of these reasons are pure and simple common sense. For instance, glass bottles are banned in almost all parks, stadiums, beaches and other locations. Cans are not banned. Therefore, brewers hoping to make their beer as portable (and potable) as possible, are opting to go the route of aluminum.

Another benefit of going with cans over bottles is the fact that cans are not quite as dangerous to consumers. Broken glass beer bottles pose a hazard to anyone near them. However, when was the last time you saw a can of beer shatter? Cans are simply safer, for both you (the drinker) and anyone else who might come along in your wake.

Finally, cans are actually better for beer, at least as far as protecting freshness. Green and brown glass is used to help block sunlight, which can affect the flavor and freshness of beer. However, cans are far superior here – obviously, they allow no light to harm the brew in question. Therefore, brewers who are concerned with providing their patrons with the most flavor possible are considering cans as a viable option.

What breweries are now using cans over bottles? Believe it or not, some of the craft beers voted "best in the nation" are now going the metal route. For instance, you'll find Oskar Blue's Dale's Pale Ale in a can. You'll also find Maui Brewing CoCoNut PorTer in a can. Surly Brewing Abrasive Ale is yet another brew that you'll only find in a can, as is 21st Amendment Bitter American.

There are tons of other brews that are going the route of canned, rather than bottled. If you have been held back by long-held misconceptions about the quality and taste of canned beer, now might be the time to taste the revolution and see what modern technology can do to offer great taste to canned brews.

Posted on March 18, 2011 and filed under Design and Packaging.